Top Five Wednesday: Upcoming Releases I’m Anticipating

Top Five Wednesday time again! This week we’re sharing the top five books we are most anticipating for the rest of 2015. Armada and Go Set A Watchman were way up there on my list for the year, so I had to come up with some new ones and I did not come up empty handed. Definitely plenty of great books coming the rest of the year.

I’ve linked Goodreads pages to the titles if you’re interested, just be wary of spoilers for the sequels on the list!

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1. Queen of Shadows by Sarah J Maas (Throne of Glass #4)-September 1st

I’m a fan of the series and am definitely always looking for more to the adventure.

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2. Walk on Earth a Stranger by Rae Carson – September 22nd

The Girl of Fire and Thorns trilogy is one of my favorite fantasy series and I’m so excited to read something else by Rae Carson.

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3. Shadows of Self by Brandon Sanderson (Mistborn #5) – October 6th

Definitely looking forward to continuing the story that started in The Alloy of Law and anything in the Mistborn world is going to land high on the reading list for me.

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4. Winter by Marissa Meyer (The Lunar Chronicles #4) – November 10th

Another series installment. This, the final Lunar Chronicles book, has been over a year in coming already and I can’t wait to have it.

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5. Soundless by Richelle Mead – November 10th

I loved Vampire Academy and Bloodlines by Richelle Mead and I’ll definitely be checking this one out.


Top Five Wednesday was created by GingerreadsLainey. To view the complete list of participants (and add your name to the list!) click here for the Goodreads group.

Top Five Wednesday: Things On My Bookshelf

Thought I’d try something a little new and do a Top Five Wednesday (Which was created by GingerReadsLainey on Youtube) in place of a Top Ten Tuesday. Both rock, but I liked this week’s top 5 Wednesday topic a ton. I don’t know how interesting mine will be, since the answer is basically just various knick-knacks, but this will be a fun one to watch/read. If you think so too, check out the complete list of T5W participants here.

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1. My Bookish Craft Project: So last summer, right after reading both available installments of Brandon Sanderson’s Stormlight Archive series, I was looking around on Tumblr for relevant posts and fan blogs and things when I came across a quick tutorial for making a little lamp that looks like the magical, light, gemstone spheres that are so significant to that book. It was easy: glass jar, and beads and little LED lights from the floral section of the craft store. I love how mine turned out.

2. Dave: They opened up a little Dave&Buster’s style restaurant/arcade/laser tag place near where I grew up and I’ve gone there a few times with friends. Picked up a stuffed minion with my arcade winnings the first time I went and now he guards my TBR. I don’t know which minion he actually is, but I decided some time ago his name would be Dave.

3. My maybe dead lucky bamboo plant. I got this for free at an Earth Day celebration thing when I was a junior in college, so it’s like 3 years old. I transplanted it a few times until it grew to it’s current size and it was doing pretty well until this spring I thought it might like some more sun and left it outside for a few days. Basically bleached it completely white before I realized what was happening and I brought it back inside and trimmed off all the dead leaves. Now we’ll wait and see if it can come back.

4. Book boxes: Bought these at Michaels. They hold bookmarks and some miscellaneous papers.

5. Some other little knick knacks:  I got a painted clay horse as a gift from my mom shortly after I moved that I think she bought in Arizona and then there’s a little pegasus on a small slab of amethyst geode that I got at a rock shop in Estes Park, CO. I also have a few Willow Tree angels that I bought ages ago still love to have. The “Wisdom” reading girl is especially perfect for the bookshelf and is probably my favorite.

May and June Reviews

It was my blogging resolution this year to write at least a mini-review of every book I read, and, though I fell behind, I haven’t failed yet! Pretty good genre variety happening in my reading life lately, which has been awesome, but it makes this post look absolutely chaotic. Fantasy? Literary fiction? YA contemporary? Sciency non-fiction? All here. Hope you find something to enjoy.

22465605Miss Mayhem (Rebel Belle #2) by Rachel Hawkins

Like it’s predecessor, Rebel Belle, this was fun modern fantasy fare. It suffers a lot from what I’ve taken to calling second-book syndrome wherein the second book in a trilogy serves only to wrap up the first book and set up the third, with no real solid plot of its own. This felt that way: a little low-stakes and boring while straining the central romance in a way that we know they will resolve by the end of book 3 because, well, we just do. I still have high hopes for book 3 of course, I think this is a solid concept with some pretty fun characters that will conclude staisfactorily, this was just a bit of a rough stop along the way.

Boundless (Unearthly #3) by Cynthia Hand13049981

This is the best paranormal romance I have read in the last year or two. I’d say only Daughter of Smoke and Bone is better (and, really, to be fair, is quite different). I was worried about this series in book 2, which definitely suffered from second book syndrome, but this final installment in the trilogy was not at all disappointing. It ended a bit abruptly, but it was very satisfying and had a love triangle that was frustrating in a good way more than a bad that had a happy–but not too happy–resolution. Clara was strong and honest, a bit of a Mary-Sue admittedly, but the kind of female lead with power I wish more romance books portrayed.

16096824A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

I listened to the audiobook of this while road tripping with my friend and we both loved this. The world is built quickly and well, its fairy tale aspects lending it inspiration and the strength of a good story, but by the end it takes enough turns that it feels fresh. I thought certain minor characters could have used more development (and that there could have been more of them in general—a big fancy castle has lots of servants that you might interact with) but overall I’m really excited to continue with this series and watch Sarah J. Maas build even more on an already stunning foundation.

Dragonfly in Amber (Outlander #2) by Diana Gabaldon5293561

Slow, slow, slow in the middle. I slogged a bit through this one, but ultimately it was really great. I love how Gabaldon played with the timeline in this one, taking us forward and then telling the bulk of the story as a story within the story. It could have been boring, but in this case it played on the tension already inherent in the build up to the Battle of Culloden Moor, which we knew was happening from the very beginning of the series. I think the early episode in Paris was dragged out a bit too long, and I think there are several scenes, like battles, where we are stuck in Claire’s perspective, when it would be a lot more interesting to follow around someone else. Overall, however, this was a really excellent follow-up; a sequel that grew the world and introduced new characters and even more complications to build on in the next installments.

6522033Voyager (Outlander #3) by Diana Gabaldon

This had some of the same pacing problems as Dragonfly in Amber, but to a lesser extent. I loved the additional perspectives, though there are definitely scenes when the overlap is very odd, especially since Claire’s perspective is always in first person while everyone else’s is told in third. Like at the beginning of this book, we see a character watching Claire in a scene that is very pivotal for Claire’s character. It would make sense to be in her head for this very quiet, internal, decision-making scene and we are not. It felt very strange to be pushed to the outside for that. It makes sense to follow other characters in scenes that Claire isn’t present for, but in a scene in which her thoughts are paramount, it really felt odd. But once we got settled and rolling with the story, the various episodes in this installment were all excellent. There were a few sections that felt overly lengthy, but for the most part the pages flew by and I don’t think the series flagging in quality at all.

Drums of Autumn (Outlander #4) by Diana Gabaldon6584000

“Oh my God, the book people are making me crazy” was the refrain on my road trip recently. This book makes the price of a Kindle Paperwhite totally worth it so you can read in the dark late into the night without disturbing your travel-mate. It had that mid-act slow down that I seem to experience a lot with this series, but I got into the crazy drama by the end. I’m loving this series. Slipping into some dangerous stereotypes here, but it’s almost soap-opera trashy while still maintaining a intellectual’s historical detail (with plenty of literary misery to go around).

18143977All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

I thought the prose in this was great, beautiful descriptions and symbolism and metaphor. The story was good, the characters even better. I get why this was so popular when it came out, but that hype combined with a sense that it was trying too hard to be literary made me like it a little bit less than I might have otherwise. Still highly recommend it, though and I’m very glad I picked it up.

Animal Farm by George Orwell170448

I was supposed to have read this when I was in 8th or 9th grade for this extra-cirricular book group I was in and I wound up not having the time. But the entire time I was reading this I was kicking myself for letting it pass me by back then, because all of my comparisions were not to Soviet Russia, but to the rhetoric of post 9/11 USA, so I kept thinking that this would have had so much more impact on 13 year old me in 2004. But still. It’s classic for a reason; very smart satire. I did think that it got a little bit repetitive at times, Orwell beating a dead horse as it were, trying a little too hard to get the point across.

23399202Openly Straight by Bill Konigsberg

The negative thing I have to say about this one is that it had somewhat strange pacing: slow to start and too jammed full of stuff in a short amount of space at the end, but overall I enjoyed it. It’s got a rather unique perspective, from a gay teenager who is feeling a little too accepted by his family and decides to move across the country, attend boarding school  where no one knows him and see what he might discover about his identity without the looming shadow of his sexuality defining him. That whole concept was fascinating to watch and it was executed well enough, though I get the feeling I’ll have completely forgotten about this story in a short amount of time.

Lying Out Loud by Kody Keplinger23399277

I really enjoyed The Duff a few months ago, so I knew I had to check this companion novel out. This one follows Sonny, who is the best friend of The Duff’s Wesley’s sister Amy. It’s also a retelling of Cyrano de Bergerac as Sonny falls in love with the new guy at school over IM…while (oops!) logged into Amy’s account. I think Kody Keplinger really knows how to construct a good character on the front end of a story, but the plot and development in this left me wanting. Character development was an unconvincing tell, not show and the friendship between Amy and Sonny didn’t ever click for me. I don’t really think this is worth it unless you’re a huge fan of all of Kody Keplinger’s books, in which case you’ve already read it.

11133791Tilt by Ellen Hopkins

My first Ellen Hopkins. I held out for a long time thinking her work wouldn’t be my thing, and it seems I was right. But I mildly enjoyed this while I was reading. A decent story, pretty good characters, ones that felt a little flat, but not so much I wasn’t enjoying myself. I really liked the structured poems with the words pulled out that made another sentence, but otherwise didn’t get the appeal of the free verse style. I finished it, thought “that was nice, but I don’t know that I’ll bother to read one of her books again” and tried to move on with my life.

But moving on with my life involved jumping in the car and driving for over an hour and I got to thinking more about this, especially the little author’s note at the end about resources for AIDS and abstaining from sex until you’re in a committed relationship and whatnot and suddenly the stories clicked together. I realized it wasn’t meant to be a realistic teen tale, but morality propaganda and it went a little more definitely sour for me. Not that abstinence is the worst thing you can preach to kids, but the sad and scary stuff  in this took on a new “Don’t have sex or ELSE” meaning that I really didn’t care for.

On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss20613511

A really interesting book about a scientific political issue that was not particularly technical or bitingly crictical of any one side (thought that’s not to say it doesn’t argue for one or the other, it just wasn’t overwrought with accusation or emotion, like so many of the vaccine arguments are. It’s extremely insightful, pointing out all kinds of crazy problematic meanings and things between the metaphors we use to describe things and what we think we mean vs what they might be revealing about our attitudes. It was short, but extremely thought-provoking, and its lyrical style makes it a great place to start if you’re looking to break into non-fiction.

22501993Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges

This took me absolutely ages to finish and I have no idea how to review it, because so much is going on in it. It’s long–probably too long–but covers an astonishing number of topics quite well. Alan Turing’s life is the thread that connects it all together, but this often deviates for lengthy stretches on tangents about mathematics, history, philosophy, computer science, and the gay experience in the early 20th century.  I found it all fascinating, and Alan Turing’s story amazing and heartbreaking by turns. I definitely recommend this, but only if you’re in for the long haul and you won’t let yourself be intimidated by some discussion of math and logic.

I especially recommend the audiobook, which has a lovely narrator who does different voices for the different written excerpts (including some unintentionally hilarious American accents) that helped me keep everything straight.

I am so glad to be caught up, I hope to have some more posts up this month now that I’m back on track!